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Commercial Motor

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TruckEast
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TruckEast has supplied Lutterworth, Leicestershire-based Bruntingthorpe Logistics with two Scania P450 car transporters.

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TruckEast has supplied Lutterworth, Leicestershire-based Bruntingthorpe Logistics with two Scania P450 car transporters.

The 6x2 low roof sleeper cab trucks with 13-litre engines include extended beds and external storage lockers on both sides. Trailer bodywork is the new Odyssey model from Essex-based Transporter Engineering.

Each will cover about 100,000 km a year, five-days-a-week, transporting new and used cars on overnight runs for the rental market and manufacturers. Transport manager at Bruntingthorpe Logistics, Martyn Rose said: “Operationally we need the low roof option, but in spite of this the sleeper cab is extremely comfortable and offers a lot more space.”

Bruntingthorpe Logistics operates a fleet of 16 car transporters - 80% of them Scanias.
“The whole team at TruckEast Corby give us a great level of service and are always willing to help”, Rose said.

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Author: Roger Brown
Posted: October 16, 2018, 9:28 am
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Health and Safety
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A cushioning product manufacturer has been fined £60,000 after a visiting tanker collided with a forklift truck in its yard.

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A cushioning product manufacturer has been fined £60,000 after a visiting tanker collided with a forklift truck in its yard.

Manchester Magistrates’ Court heard how, on 23 June 2017, the vehicle was reversing into a tanker discharge bay at the Carpenter facility in Dinting Lodge, Glossop, when it collided at low speed with a forklift truck. No workers were injured in the incident.

A Health and Safety Executive (HSE) investigation into the incident found that the company had insufficient control of workplace transport, in particular, reversing vehicles. Carpenter Limited pleaded guilty to breaching Section 2(1) of the Health and Safety at Work Act 1974 and was ordered to pay costs of £1,302.

Following the hearing, HSE inspector Medani Close said: “The host company failed to undertake a number of simple safety measures including segregation of reversing vehicles from other moving vehicles and pedestrians, and ensuring that reversing manoeuvres were supervised.”

Author: Roger Brown
Posted: October 16, 2018, 8:31 am
Editorial Content Category: 
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Autonomous vehicles
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The Law Commission is undertaking a project to identify what new legislation will be required to cover autonomous vehicles.

 

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In today’s society there is a constant push to develop more efficient and effective ways of doing business. The logistics and transport sector is no different and we have seen many innovative technologies being introduced, the most significant being automation.

For an industry that has always heavily invested in people to deliver seamless customer service and ensure road and vehicle safety, automated technology is a huge disrupter and one that is met with both suspicion and excitement. Automotive technology is used in many other industries such as manufacturing and warehousing with great economic benefits to industries.

For drivers, terminology like automated vehicles suggests they will have limited input in any driving, being able to sit back and wait to arrive at a destination. In reality it is likely to be a more blended approach, with the driver having ultimate control.

Insurance groups, while remaining open to new technology, advise against such terms, which give the impression that drivers can simply take their eyes off the road, which is unlikely to be satisfactory from an accountability perspective.

A group of 11 UK motor insurers, led by the Association of British Insurers (ABI) and Thatcham Research, has been formed to consider key issues relating to automated driving on UK roads, particularly concerning insurance and liability.

The Automated Driving Insurer Group will feed into ABI policy and work with the government on shaping the future of automated vehicle use in the UK. Automatic technology has already been introduced, with automated electronic braking (AEB) hugely popular, while other examples of automatic technology regularly seen are adaptive cruise control functions and automatic headlights and wipers.

At present, the use of automated vehicles does not fit in with the UK’s legislative regime. While new technologies are being trialled, the Law Commission is undertaking a joint project to identify what new legislation is required and how we can ensure that new technology does not result in an unsatisfactory system that fails to protect members of the public.

The main areas to be explored are:
. accountability - the extent of the driver or user’s responsibility - keeping eyes on the road, hands on the wheel, overriding the braking system and so on;
. allocation of criminal and civil responsibility;
. what new legislation is required to cover new situations; and
. how the risk to road users changes with the use of automated vehicles.

The Law Commission project will not address the separate issue of cyber security, but this is being explored by policy documents issued by the DfT. Vehicles essentially become part of IT and Wi-Fi networks, which would be as vulnerable to cyber attacks and system failures as any other system.

The policy document outlines the criteria that must be considered by any manufacturer to ensure that road users are as protected as possible. This includes accountability at board level, effective systems of maintenance, an ability to respond to failure and robust anti-hacking protection.

It will be fascinating to see how this changes the face of the transport industry and whether it is all or nothing, leaving those who fail to embrace this technology left behind. The industry surely cannot afford to ignore this revolution.

Truck platoon trials have taken place under controlled conditions on the continent with positive outcomes for some time and in August 2017, the government announced that the UK will see lorry platoon trials this year. Midlands Connect is one of the stakeholders looking to support the trial in the Midlands.

Our roads may need to be redesigned for wider access and to allow harmony with other traditional road users. While the technology isn’t too difficult to envisage, it is the ancillary questions that remain unanswered.

If one of the vehicles in a platoon breaks down, how easy is it to simply remove the vehicle and regroup? Another widely speculated issue is how the financial benefits are split through the group. The efficiency savings could differ according to a vehicle’s position in the platoon and a separate commercial arrangement either between the parties or administered by a third party may be necessary.

Ocado has opened a fully automated warehouse and DHL is looking to develop similar technology. When looking at the transport industry however, the issues are seemingly a lot more complex and are being explored through a number of government-funded trials and studies.

The UK has pledged £25m, to be matched by industry, to fund various projects via its Centre for Connected and Automated Vehicles, alongside manufacturers and technology companies. The investment would indicate that in some form, we will see automated technology in vehicles on our road in the next decade, although it is not clear what its extent will be.

It is claimed that the use of this technology has the potential to eliminate some of the 25,000 serious accidents on UK roads every year that are ordinarily attributed to human error.

By Laura Newton, associate solicitor at Rothera Sharp specialising in transport law.

 

 

 

Author: Anonymous
Posted: October 15, 2018, 11:34 am
Editorial Content Category: 
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Applications and decisions
Summary: 

Commercial Motor picks out some of the latest O-licence applications and decisions issued.

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Cool Move Logistics can base 10 vehicles and 10 trailers at a site in Whittle Avenue, Segensworth, Fareham.

J Edwards Services has been granted authorisation for three vehicles and three trailers at the Wrings Transport site on the Severn View Industrial Park, Hallen, Bristol.

AW Cleaver Haulage has been given the go-ahead for 30 vehicles and 20 trailers at land off Cotswold Dene, Lakeside Industrial Estate, Witney.

Mulholland International can station six vehicles and two trailers at the Bristol & Avon Transport & Recycling site in Severn Road, Hallen, Bristol.

Reynolds Catering Supplies has been given permission to locate 20 vehicles and one trailer at a unit in Bone Lane, Newbury.

CWM Transport can base five vehicles and three trailers at the Moto Hospitality site, Oxford Road, Thatcham.

Gregory Distribution (Holdings) has been given the green light for five vehicles and 10 trailers at the Hello Fresh facility, Chalker Way, Banbury.

Grafton Merchanting GB can base two vehicles at a unit in Dunbeath Road, Elgin Industrial Estate, Swindon.

Chunky Grab Hire & Aggregates can base three vehicles at Field Barn Farm, Beenham Hill, Reading.

Author: Roger Brown
Posted: October 15, 2018, 8:40 am
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O-licence
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New EU proposals could see part of the LCV sector brought under regulatory control for the first time.

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It is more than 20 years since the Goods Vehicles (Licensing of Operators) Act 1995 came into force. During that time, subject to certain exemptions, operators of goods vehicles with a gross plated weight in excess of 3.5 tonnes that are being used for hire or reward or in connection with a trade or business have been subject to the regulatory control set out in the 1995 Act.

In 2011 amendments were made to the Act to incorporate the provisions of EU Regulation 1071/2009, establishing common rules on conditions to be complied with for those wishing to pursue the occupation of road transport operator. As part of this, changes were made in 2011 relating to vehicles under 3.5 tonnes towing a small trailer.

The exemption was no longer available for those towing a small trailer and engaged in work for hire or reward. This year the exemptions regarding mobile plant vehicles have been tightened, with an amendment being made to the 1995 Goods Vehicles (Licensing of Operators) Regulations to restrict the exemption for mobile plant to vehicles where the only goods carried by the vehicle are either used for the propulsion of the vehicle or are loose tools or equipment.

Distinctions between licence holders

The 1995 Act makes various distinctions between the regulation of restricted and standard licence holders. At both the initial application stage and during the currency of the licence, there are different requirements for the different types of licence.

One major difference relates to finance. Both applicants for and holders of goods vehicle operator’s licences need a level of financial resources to show financial security, but the levels required differ significantly.

Currently the levels for restricted licences are £3,100 for the first vehicle and £1,700 for each additional vehicle, compared with £7,950 for the first vehicle and £4,400 for each subsequent vehicle for standard licence holders. Part of the discrepancy is because the levels for standard licence holders are set out in the 2011 regulations at €9,000 (£8,000) for the first vehicle and €5,000 for each additional vehicle and are adjusted each year to reflect changes in the exchange rate.

The traffic commissioners (TCs) are currently undertaking a consultation process on whether or not to alter the level of financial resources required for a restricted licence. The levels have not been changed since 2004 when, with the country being in recession, the TCs used their discretion not to impose any additional burden on restricted licence operators.

One option regarding the level of financial resources and on which the TCs are seeking views, is whether or not to standardise the requirement across all types of licences. As the requirements for a standard licence are set out in the EU regulation - at least for the time being - the sum required for a restricted licence would have to be raised to equate to that of the standard licence.

While the TCs are considering whether or not to harmonise the position of restricted and standard licences in relation to financial resources, in Brussels the European Commission has published a proposal for a new regulation to bring LCVs within the scope of operator licensing. In 2016 the EC undertook a public consultation exercise and concluded that the present regulation was only partially effective in ensuring fair competition across the whole of the EU.

The proposal is to amend the existing Regulation 1071/2009 in various areas, including extending its provisions to LCVs. One of the purposes behind the proposal is to ensure a minimum level of professionalism from those operating LCVs.

In 2016 there were 3.8 million vans registered in Great Britain, compared with 493,600 heavy goods vehicles. The EU’s proposal is that the requirement to hold an O-licence be extended to apply to LCVs.

Currently, there is provision in EU Regulation No 1071/2009 for derogation by member states for the provisions of the regulation to apply to vehicles with a maximum laden mass not exceeding 3.5 tonnes. However this derogation allows for different provision across the EU.

The proposed new regulation would remove this derogation and bring consistency throughout the EU. The proposed new regulation will ensure there is a minimum level of professionalism in the LCV sector and by making these operators subject to regulation, improve the fairness between this sector and those currently subject to O-licensing.

The proposals only apply to those who use LCVs for hire and reward. Not all the requirements that currently need to be satisfied by a standard licence-holder would be applicable to the LCV sector.

They would need to satisfy the requirement to show that they had an effective and stable establishment in the country issuing the licence and that they were of appropriate financial standing. However, it is proposed that those operators operating only LCVs would be subject to less vigorous financial requirements, with €1,800 or equivalent needed for the first vehicle and €900 for each subsequent vehicle.

Proposal exclusions

The proposal excludes such operators from the mandatory requirements regarding transport managers, good repute and professional competence, although member states could apply these provisions if they so wished. In addition to the fair competition arguments, there are also road safety benefits from more vehicles being subject to regular inspections and daily defect reporting.

The DfT already publishes a best-practice guide for van operators. The proposals are currently going through the EU legislative process, the final stage of which will be publication in the official journal and then coming into force 20 days after publication.

Given that regulations take direct effect, it is possible that the proposals may be implemented and apply during the EU withdrawal agreement implementation period. If that were the case, or if the UK adopted similar provisions it would, for the first time, bring part of the LCV sector under regulatory control.

. By Christabel Hallas, a solicitor specialising in transport law. She can be contacted on 01756 790631 or christabelhallas.co.uk

Author: Anonymous
Posted: October 12, 2018, 1:56 pm
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Britcom Grimsby
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Britcom has supplied Grimsby Institute with a Euro-6 tractor unit to enable its automotive engineers to experience modern trucks

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Britcom has supplied Grimsby Institute with a Euro-6 tractor unit to enable its automotive engineers to develop their knowledge and experience of modern trucks.

The unit, supplied by Britcom in conjunction with MAN Truck & Bus UK, will be used by the Automotive Engineering learners to further develop their knowledge and experience of modern trucks on the UK’s roads, while training on the 2014 Euro 6 MAN TGX 26.480 6x2 will also be supported by Britcom.

Ian Gedney, UK sales representative for Britcom, explained “We were incredibly happy to get the opportunity to work with Grimsby Institute on this project, supplying the students with a truck using the latest technology, really is “Investing in the future”. The truck industry has an issue trying to get young people involved and choosing it as a career path, especially as HGV mechanics; seeing the class size and enthusiasm of the learners once the truck arrived is a huge positive step forward for the industry.

Matthew Holness, curriculum manager automotive engineering for Grimsby Institute, added “Our tutor has worked on HGV most of his life and his industry knowledge is invaluable. Britcom will be providing us with technical support in the future and this combined with our tutors' expertise will ensure our learners leave us at the highest level and industry ready”

Author: George Barrow
Posted: October 12, 2018, 9:49 am
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O-licence
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Redhill Scaffolding Services and its sole director have been disqualified from holding an O-licence for 18 months following an investigation that revealed widespread non-compliance at the firm.

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Redhill Scaffolding Services and its sole director have been disqualified from holding an O-licence for 18 months following an investigation that revealed widespread non-compliance at the firm.

In a written decision following a September public inquiry (PI) in Eastbourne, London & South East traffic commissioner (TC) Sarah Bell said the company and Ronald Williams had put “commercial gain before compliance, over a sustained period of time.”

In December 2017 a DVSA traffic examiner stopped an 18-tonne truck operated by the business at the roadside and discovered a range of offences. The driver was not using a driver card and failed to produce tachograph record sheets, a driver card or printouts.

There was a defective tachograph, no goods vehicle test certificate in force and the vehicle was also displaying a disc in the name of another company - Personnel Hygiene Services. A DVSA vehicle examiner visited the company’s site in February and conducted a maintenance investigation marked unsatisfactory.

There was no evidence of start-of-day walkround checks being carried out, no drivers’ defect reporting system in use and no record of any defect rectification or remedial work being carried out. In addition, PMIs were not being carried out by the stated contractor.

Williams and his son were invited to a New Operator Seminar in June but failed to attend telling the traffic examiner they had “forgotten”. By the time of the PI a proper brake testing regime was not in place and there were no printouts available for the TC to examine.

The company was not using its company card to download vehicle unit (VU) information and produced inadequate drivers hours’ and working time directive (WTD) data. Also, the vehicle examiner expressed concern that there was insufficient capacity to park two vehicles at the firm’s operating centre.

At the inquiry the TC examined the firm’s history which included a formal warning for maintenance shortcomings in November 2009. Also, in October 2012 the operator had its licence suspended for 48 hours for tachograph offences and parking more vehicles than authorised.

At the inquiry, Williams told the TC that the firm had joined the RHA and booked an Operator’s Awareness course for November. It had also experienced two clear DVSA roadside encounters recently.

However, in her written decision Bell said the operator’s systems were inadequate “across the board” and only limited improvements had been put in place by the time of the PI. She said: “Since December 2017, the operator has come into sharp focus for DVSA and now myself.

"The crucial area where there has been no discernible effort is the enhancement of the director or ‘responsible person’s’ knowledge. Williams has taken up a great deal of TC and DVSA time over the years.

"It is his fault alone that he has reached this stage. In my judgement, he should be removed from the system for a period for the benefit and protection of other operators and road users.”

Author: Roger Brown
Posted: October 12, 2018, 8:34 am
Editorial Content Category: 
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Mark Luck
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Two hauliers have received heavy fines for their involvement in illegally depositing waste at a golf range in Kent.

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Two hauliers have received heavy fines for their involvement in illegally depositing waste at a golf range in Kent.

Sevenoaks Magistrates’ Court heard that 2,157 truck loads of waste soil were deposited at the Great Chart Golf & Leisure facility in Ashford between 2012 and 2015, equating to 42,000 tonnes, significantly exceeding the 1,000-tonne limit allowed.

Swanley-based Mark Luck had deposited 1,292 loads and Robert Body Haulage based in Tonbridge dumped 715 loads during this timeframe. They deposited the waste soil to create bunds around the driving range, build a zorbing ramp and raise an area of ground outside the terms of three U1 exemptions that had been registered with the Environment Agency.

Only one of these exemptions may be registered on a site in a three-year period and allows the use of only up to 1,000 tonnes of clean waste soil in a small scale construction scheme. To import more than 1,000 tonnes of soil the operators should have obtained an environmental permit from the Environment Agency.

These permits require operators to put in place stringent measures to ensure the suitability of the waste that is deposited and minimise the impact from the activities on the land and the surrounding land users. Mark Luck from Mark Luck, who pleaded guilty to breaches of section 33(1)(a) and (6) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990, was fined £40,000 with £4,036 costs and a £170 victim surcharge.

Robert Body from Robert Body Haulage, who also pleaded guilty to breaching section 33(1)(a) and (6) of the Environmental Protection Act 1990, was fined £26,000 with £2,952 costs and a £170 victim surcharge. Brothers Grant and John Kay, who run the facility, both pleaded guilty to breaching regulation 12(1)(a) and 38(1)(b) of the Environmental Permitting (England and Wales) Regulations 2010.

They were individually fined £325 with Grant Kay having to pay £4,723 costs and £32 victim surcharge and John Kay paying £2,724 costs and £32 victim surcharge. Magistrates heard that all four parties were fully co-operative with the Environment Agency’s investigation and pleaded guilty at the earliest opportunity.

The court accepted that the brothers had limited knowledge of the waste industry but that the hauliers - both of who have a long history in road transport - should have known better than to deposit large volumes of waste on the site. Environment manager Alan Cansdale said: “The Environment Agency supports the use of U1 exemptions for those who wish to use small quantities of clean waste in construction projects.

“We will not tolerate however the deposit of excessive volumes of inappropriate waste for financial gain under the terms of this authorisation. While we will work closely with businesses to help them comply with such legislation, in cases where individuals consistently operate illegally and in this case outside the terms of an exemption, we have no hesitation in prosecuting them.”

Author: Roger Brown
Posted: October 11, 2018, 8:38 am
Editorial Content Category: 
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F H Nash Baileys Lawrence David trailer
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Horse foods haulier FH Nash has bought two curtainsider trailers from Lawrence David.

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Horse food producer FH Nash has bought two curtainsiders from Lawrence David.

FH Nash makes Baileys Horse Feeds, delivering the product across the UK.

The new curtainsiders are standard length but feature slimline bulkheads to enhance air flow around the trailer body. Attached to each is a galvanised steel damage protector, which the manufacturer claims increases the lifespan of each curtainsider.

Minty Knowles, Baileys horse feed brand manager, said: “Baileys’ fleet of curtainsider trailers are all emblazoned with Baileys-fed horses, often ‘in action’ in a variety of disciplines and most ridden by Baileys sponsored riders or staff – and no two livery designs are the same.”

Lawrence David opted for digitally printed curtains to maximise the quality of the images.

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Author: Kylie Noble
Posted: October 10, 2018, 2:46 pm
Editorial Content Category: 
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Hauliers most affected by the Leeds Clean AIr Zone (CAZ) may soon be able to bid for a grant of up to £16,000 if the council's request for funding is approved by government.

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Hauliers most affected by the Leeds Clean AIr Zone (CAZ) will be able to bid for a grant of up to £16,000 if the council's request for funding is approved by government.

Leeds announced its final CAZ plans yesterday, which will see non Euro-6 HGVs charged £50 per day to enter the designated zone.

While there are no notable vehicle type exemptions for the HGV sector, the council said it is putting in place support measures for local businesses affected by the CAZ.

One of these is a £27m finance pot to support local firms in upgrading their fleets, which the council will ask the government to fund from its £220m Clean Air Fund.

If approved by government, the council told CM it expects around £13m of the total fund to be used to help hauliers upgrade their non-compliant HGVs. This will be in the form of grants worth up to £16,000 that hauliers can bid for ahead of the CAZ.

The funding scheme was initially devised to support retrofit systems, but following industry concerns that technology would not be ready in time for CAZ compliance, the council has extended the scheme for use buying new and second-hand compliant trucks, or paying off lease balances early.

Leeds added that the support would be particularly focused towards businesses that are located within the CAZ and which will be “most financially impacted by the proposals”.

The council has also introduced a ‘Lack of Market Capacity’ exemption clause from CAZ charging. This is to address industry concerns surrounding over-demand of Euro-6 vehicles and the late development of retrofit systems.

It would allow operators that have placed an order (by a pre-defined date) of a compliant vehicle or retrofit system to benefit from a sunset period until it arrives.

Evidence will be needed of the order being placed and the vehicle/system being available within a reasonable time.

The council states: “This is considered appropriately reasonable in these circumstances as the CAZ proposals are not intended to be a revenue raising mechanism, but are intended as a means of securing compliance with the legal limit value for nitrogen dioxide in the shortest possible time.”

The proposed “go live” date for the Leeds CAZ is 6 January 2020.

Leeds rejected calls from industry to push back the implementation date or use a staged approach to charging based on vehicle age.

It said its legal obligation was to put in place measures as soon as possible to improve air quality.

Its own commissioned research had shown the difference in emissions reduction between Euro-3 and Euro-5 vehicles was not sufficient to warrant charging different amounts.

“A tapered or phased in approach would therefore impact on the effectiveness of the clean air charging zone to reduce air pollution levels in Leeds to within legal limits in the shortest possible timescale,” it said.

Councillor James Lewis, executive member with responsibility for sustainability and the environment, said:“The plans we’re putting forward have been carefully developed following months of consultation with thousands of residents and local businesses to ensure they are the best plans for Leeds. They will improve air quality within the shortest possible time, tackling air pollution and protecting the health of everyone in the city.

“A key element of these proposals is the support we’re proposing to help affected local businesses transition to cleaner vehicles which avoid charges. We believe that it is important to help local businesses in order for the zone to most successfully reduce pollution.”

The Leeds CAZ final proposals will be submitted to the government on 23 October, with approval expected eight weeks after this date.

Author: Hayley Pink
Posted: October 10, 2018, 1:29 pm