Trace Systems

Complete Fleet, Garage and
Workshop Management Software
Designed to Save You Time and Money

01676 534746 or email

Industry News

Commercial Motor

Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
Summary: 

2 Start Training has ordered four new 11m long Cartwright, single-deck, tandem-axle box van trailers which feature side skirts.

Body Paragraphs: 

2 Start Training has ordered four new 11m long Cartwright, single-deck, tandem-axle box van trailers which feature side skirts.

Paul Moon, managing director of 2 Start Training said: “We chose Cartwright because we have used other suppliers in the past and their service and issues with trailers led us to find a new partner.”

Further specification includes a Haldex braking system with roll stability, Cheetah aerodynamic side guards and a phenolic coated plywood floor rated to ISO 1496 loading specification.  

Lucy Wood, design and marketing executive, said: “We have had no issues with our current trailer and customers have positively commented on the design and colours.”

One out of the four trailers was delivered in March, with the rest expected between July and the end of August, and will be based across 2 Start Training’s bases in Reading, Southampton, Worthing and Portsmouth.

New DAFs have been bought, too: due at the end of June is a CF FT450 4x2 tractor. Waiting to greet it is a LF230 4x2 rigid which arrived in April.

“We are part way through a programme of updating our fleet from old to new. We wanted to replace four trailers and purchase another for a DAF on order,” Wood explained.

“We purchased DAF because we receive exceptional service from Adams Moray in Portsmouth; our local DAF dealership. DAF is a world renowned manufacturer of HGVs and we are committed to providing the best quality vehicles to our customers.”

Related content filters: 
Field: 
bundle
Value: 
Product
Author: Callum Poole
Posted: June 14, 2019, 2:33 pm
Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
iveco-stralis-x-way-at340
Summary: 

Don’t be put off by its initial toylike appearance – the IVECO Stralis X-Way is one for serious grown-ups.

Body Paragraphs: 

Jump to: Highlights, Specifications, In the cab

Don’t be put off by its initial toylike appearance – the IVECO Stralis X-Way is one for serious grown-ups.

When we first encounter this IVECO Stralis X-Way, it is amid a line-up of rivals, and to be honest, with its high ground clearance, low-roof and narrow sleeper cab, it looks a bit like an overgrown Tonka toy. On closer inspection, that appearance proves deceptive.

Once inside the Active Time cab, the environment is light and airy, perhaps too much so, but we’ll come back to that. There’s no really obvious clue as to where the missing 8in of width has gone, although the substitution of the wrap-around central dash of wider versions with the flat dash in the Active Time is almost certainly involved. It’s not a particularly onerous trade-off, though, as the space released is a noticeable benefit, and it means the infotainment screen is visible from the passenger seat.




The very existence of the X-Way variant of the Stralis is to save weight for payload-conscious construction operators. Carefully considered optimisation of core component specification obviously plays a part in this, but the IVECO goes further. Wherever you look, there are little weight-saving hacks that all add up. For example, while it might be easier to make the partitions in the under-bunk storage from plywood or MDF, the X-Way has a beautifully crafted sheet of drilled aluminium. The end result is an 8x4 tipper which, bodied and with full tanks and a realistically shaped driver, has a payload of 20 tonnes with enough capacity left over for a week’s worth of essentials that are easily stored. Not that we’d want to actually spend a night in this example. While the side and rear cab glazing certainly helps visibility while tipping, the apparent lack of provision for curtains on the rear wall means you’d be unlikely to oversleep past dawn. However, a brief test suggests that the bunk itself would be perfectly comfortable for sleeping. While it’s a good height for sitting on, headroom is limited and the otherwise welcome cool box and storage bins under the bunk would interfere with your legs.

The interior is largely black and grey, with none of the shoddy plastics that once defined IVECO. Controls have a pleasant feel, but some, like the push-button gear selection, need learning if you’re new to IVECO. Nothing challenging – just different. Conventional dials dominate the colourful, high-resolution digital dash display.

The Cursor engine range has always impressed with its ability to punch above its weight.

This current Euro-6 Hi-SCR example, a 9-litre rated at that capacity’s highest output, 400hp, is no exception. That power certainly feels more than adequate for 32 tonnes, and it is delivered smoothly and quietly. At top speed on a dual-carriageway, the greatest noise comes from the tyres, and that isn’t enough to be a problem.

The 12-speed ZF TraXon is as smooth as ever, with its speedy decision-making ability meaning there is little to be gained by trying to outguess it. The TraXon’s off-road mode also helps by optimising shift strategy and providing a rocking function.

Highlights

  • Well-engineered weight-saving design features.
  • Compact cab still provides generous accommodation.
  • Excellent turning circle enhances on-site manoeuvrability.
  • Greatly improved quality of interior trim.
  • Electronic instrument panel is attractive and functional.

(Back to top)

Generally, the dynamics are good – you get a smooth ride, secure handling and reassuring brakes. When it comes to on-site ability, the Stralis X-Way is available in three options. ON provides the standard level, ON+ adds mildly enhanced off-road protection, while the OFF package as fitted to our test truck is for regular use on challenging sites – this includes raised ground clearance and a 25-degree approach angle. If you frequently operate in seriously arduous conditions, IVECO offers a hydraulically driven front-axle option. While it is not the only manufacturer to do so, IVECO certainly seems to be the most active in supplying it in the UK.

Vehicle specifications

  • Make - IVECO
  • Model - Stralis X-Way AT340
  • Chassis layout - 8x4
  • Cab type (as tested) - AT low-roof sleeper
  • Cab floor height from ground - 1,530mm
  • First step height - 500mm
  • Engine - FPT Cursor 9, 8.7-litre
  • Power - 394hp at 2,300rpm
  • Torque - 1,700Nm at 1,200rpm
  • Transmission - ZF TraXon 12-speed with off-road software
  • Body manufacturer and type - Wilcox
  • Tipping gear - Edbro CX15 front end
  • Sheeting system - Dawbarn
  • Weighing system - VPG
  • Kerb weight* - 9,079kg
  • Net body / payload allowance - 22,921kg
  • Fuel / AdBlue tanks** - 290/50 litres
  • Steering turns - 6.2
  • Turning circle - 18.4m
  • Noise – tickover - 47.6dB(A)

*basic chassis with day or extended day cab, no driver, empty tanks **as tested

(Back to top)

You do not need a tape measure to realise that the X-Way’s manoeuvrability is good – its steering lock is visibly tighter than the sector norm, looking a bit like a black cab on full lock. While you might not want to use it all on the road in the interest of tyre life, it’s very helpful on site. Overall, the steering is light enough to be helpful at manoeuvring speed without being too light at higher speeds and on country roads.







(Back to top)

When we reach our load’s destination, everything is easily within reach. The tailgate lock and PTO switch are on the dash, with the tipping lever on the engine hump. Personally, we find this to be a convenient location, rather than buried somewhere behind your right hip which seems to be the current trend. There is a reversing camera fitted, but slightly surprisingly, it has a standalone display screwed to the dash, although the comprehensive infotainment/sat-nav unit has a camera input available that isn’t used.

The Stralis X-Way may not be every tipper operator’s first choice, but that is probably more down to perception and prejudice than its ability. Do yourself a favour and get a demonstrator for a week or two – you might be pleasantly surprised.

Related content filters: 
Field: 
im_field_vehicle_make
Value: 
636
Author: Colin Barnett
Posted: June 14, 2019, 11:37 am
Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
Summary: 

VERA, Volvo Truck’s autonomous, electric and connected vehicle, will undertake its first operation in collaboration with DFDS Group.

Body Paragraphs: 

VERA, Volvo Truck’s autonomous, electric and connected vehicle, will undertake its first operation in collaboration with DFDS Group, transporting goods from its logistics centre to a port terminal in Gothenburg.

Mikael Karlsson, vice president of autonomous solutions at Volvo Trucks, said: “Now we have the opportunity to implement VERA in an ideal setting and further develop her potential for similar operations.”

The operation will show how VERA can be used in the working world to enable a connected system for an efficient, flexible and sustainable flow of goods from DFDS’ logistics centre for global distribution, to the port.

“It will be moving containerised goods with mixed cargo, and if this test goes well, we aim to scale-up the solution,” Karlsson added.

Although a date for the test is yet to be set, Volvo Trucks hopes to implement a connected system of several VERA monitored by one control room after it has been carried out.

Torben Carlsen, CEO of DFDS said: “This collaboration will help us develop a long-term solution for receiving autonomous vehicles arriving at our gates, benefitting our customers, the environment and our business.”

CM covered VERA’s launch at the Manufacturers Innovation Summit in Berlin last September. Designed specifically for short-distance journeys, it’s powered by a driveline derived from Volvo’s eFL and eFE, giving it a range of over 100km with a top speed of 25mph.

After the trial, Volvo hopes to further develop VERA’s technology and exploring how it can be used within existing infrastructures before it’s fully-operational, stating it could support “today’s transport solutions”.

Related content filters: 
Field: 
im_field_vehicle_make
Value: 
956
Author: Callum Poole
Posted: June 14, 2019, 9:49 am
Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
Summary: 

A team of British engineers have designed a composite anti-roll bar which promises significant weight reductions for trucks.

Body Paragraphs: 

A British team is currently working on the development of new light-weight composite truck anti-roll bars. The increasing impact of more safety, emissions and comfort equipment on modern trucks has seen a significant rise in their weight, with an eight-tonne tractor unit not uncommon, and a corresponding loss of payload potential.

Sheffield’s Tinsley Bridge Ltd, whose client list for anti-roll and stabiliser bars includes the Volvo Group and Iveco, is partnered on the project by engineering designers Performance Engineered Solutions (PES) Ltd and the University of Sheffield’s Advanced Manufacturing Research Centre (AMRC). The project is co-funded by the UK's innovation agency, Innovate UK.

PES Performance is leading the design and engineering, while the AMRC is producing the prototypes bars using a technique where glass and carbon-fibre filaments ae wound onto a mandrel to create the shape.

The project is now into its second phase, the first having achieved a significant 65% reduction in the weight of the stabiliser bar by replacing the current solid steel component with a carbon fibre composite member. This phase is concentrating on keeping that weight reduction while maintaining performance and durability.

Tinsley Bridge project manager, Russell Crow says “The targeted application of composite materials in automotive and rail applications has the potential to form the basis of a new era of vehicles. Significant weight reduction can be achieved by redesigning structural and safety-critical components to maximise their performance when manufactured from non-traditional materials.”

Author: Colin Barnett
Posted: June 14, 2019, 9:14 am
Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
Summary: 

June is already proving to be a big month for the next generation digital tachograph. The first vehicles have already been fitted with smart tachographs and this represents the biggest change to tachograph legislation in 12 years.

Body Paragraphs: 

June is already proving to be a big month for the next generation digital tachograph. The first vehicles have already been fitted with smart tachographs and this represents the biggest change to tachograph legislation in 12 years.

To help drivers and vehicle operators prepare for the transition, Aquarius IT produced a White Paper earlier in the year and will host an hour-long free webinar with Commercial Motor at 2pm on 18 June to explain all the changes further.

While the webinar event focussed on how the new technology will impact on roadside enforcement, another key consideration, on a practical level, for operators will be to make sure current downloading tools are compatible with the new smart tachograph.

Mark Johnston, customer service director at Aquarius IT, explains: “Whilst we know there are no significant changes to the way the new digital tachograph unit will function from a drivers or vehicle operators point of view (the changes are more of a technical nature within the unit’s internal workings for roadside enforcement), there will be some changes to the structure and the format to how the data is generated.”

“This will mean that existing downloading devices, especially first and even secondary generation tools, may not work with the new smart tachograph or may not download all the additional data from the new tachograph,” he advises.

Download device users who are concerned about the compatibility of their units can contact the team at Aquarius IT for help and advice.

Johnson also confirmed that a plan is in place for Aquarius IT’s Clockwatcher Elite customers, to ensure this potential hardware issue is managed as smoothly as possible.

For further information call Aquarius IT on 0330 333 8789 or visit https://aquariusit.com/shop/ for details on the latest digital downloading tools.

Author: Sponsored Story
Posted: June 13, 2019, 12:49 pm
Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
Summary: 

Grimsby-based Hedges Chilled Distribution has ordered two Krone Cool Liner trailers after having positive experiences renting the same model.

Body Paragraphs: 

Grimsby-based Hedges Chilled Distribution has ordered two Krone Cool Liner trailers after having positive experiences renting the same model.

The operator, which holds an O-licence for an allocation of 18 vehicles and 25 trailers, will use them for retails and groupage movements.

The Cool Liner exteriors are made out of duoplex steel and has aluminium flooring. The main structure consists of double-T, longitudinal beams and a Z-profile rear traverse section with diagonal reinforcements for extra rigidity.

Ciaron Reynolds, MD at Hedges (pictured), said he was expecting low total cost of ownerhip in the long-term: “The well-insulated ATP-rated Cool Liner with dual evaporators helps to guarantee set temperatures at all times.”

Delta-shaped rubber buffers have also been fitted across the rear frame and steel alongside roll-compression impact buffers mounted on either side, which provides docking protection to loading bays. Krone axles with drum brakes were specified for low-maintenance and added longevity.

Related content filters: 
Field: 
im_field_vehicle_type
Value: 
1246
Author: Callum Poole
Posted: June 13, 2019, 11:31 am
Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
Summary: 

A transport manager whose involvement in a haulage business was likened to “popping up on a Friday afternoon for a cup of tea and a chat” has been disqualified and has lost his repute.

Body Paragraphs: 

A transport manager whose involvement in a haulage business was likened to “popping up on a Friday afternoon for a cup of tea and a chat” has been disqualified and has lost his repute.

Anthony Seculer, deputy traffic commissioner for the Welsh traffic area, said Paul Tedaldi had “patently failed to effectively and continuously manage the transport activities” at Paul Ricketts Transport, which was authorised to run three lorries and two trailers.

Tedaldi and company director Paul Ricketts appeared before the deputy TC after a DVSA investigation found shortcomings in the haulier’s maintenance, drivers’ hours and tachograph systems.

The deputy TC found that the 10-weekly safety inspection interval was exceeded and the operator had not kept vehicles fit and serviceable.

Tedaldi, who was paid just £300 a year, was described as “conspicuous by his absence” during the DVSA investigation and Seculer said he was unconvincing as a witness:

“I cannot accept that Mr Tedaldi is a competent person to provide constant and effective management on any licence,” he said. “In failing to engage in a proper transport manager arrangement, the operator has placed his repute and operator’s licence in jeopardy. Professional competence is a mandatory requirement and operators who avoid this requirement place public safety at risk.”

Tedaldi was disqualified indefinitely as a transport manager, while Ricketts retained his repute “by the narrowest of margins”. The licence was suspended, however, until a competent transport manager was accepted onto it.

  • Why not register for our Compliance Bulletin to receive the latest legal and fleet management advice fortnightly? Sign up free now
Author: Chris Tindall
Posted: June 13, 2019, 11:26 am
Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
Summary: 

Romsey Tree Surgeons has taken delivery of a new 3.5-tonne FUSO Canter 3C13 from South of England Mercedes-Benz dealership Marshall Truck and Van.

Body Paragraphs: 

Romsey Tree Surgeons has taken delivery of a new 3.5-tonne FUSO Canter 3C13 from South of England Mercedes-Benz dealership Marshall Truck and Van.

The vehicle has a high-sided tiping body built by Solent Bodybuilders and Repairs as well as a toolbox with locking shutter doors on both sides with a mesh-sided tray fitted beneath the body for carrying signage and equipment. The FUSO is fitted with a hitch for towing a wood chipper, too.

Owner Ross Woodley, bought the company’s first Canter in 2004. His most recent Canter has a comfort day cab and a 130hp 3.0-litre turbo diesel engine.

Woodley said: “I buy a new Canter every three years, and always have two at any one time – my other truck has been on the road since 2015. When they’re due for change I sell them privately. We don’t do a lot of miles but when I come to replace them I’m always impress by their residual values.”

He claims the Canter’s appeal lies in its strength and rugged durability provided by its ladder-frame chassis: “Most of its 3.5-tonne competitors are based on vans, which aren’t robust enough for our operation.”

The firm also operates a Mercedes Citan, again supplied by Marshalls Truck and Van.

“They handle all of the liaison and movements with the bodybuilder, while we also utilise FUSO Service Contracts – we drop the vehicles off at the end of the day and the work’s done overnight so we’re ready to roll again next morning.” 

Related content filters: 
Field: 
im_field_vehicle_make
Value: 
581
Author: Callum Poole
Posted: June 13, 2019, 11:25 am
Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
O-licence
Summary: 

A convicted drug smuggler has had an appeal against a deputy traffic commissioner’s (TC) refusal to grant him an O-licence dismissed.

Body Paragraphs: 

A convicted drug smuggler has had an appeal against a deputy traffic commissioner’s (TC) refusal to grant him an O-licence dismissed.

Peter Elsagood received a 14-year prison sentence in 2003 after a court found him guilty of conspiracy to import heroin and cocaine using a lorry fitted with a false air tank. He was released in 2009 but when he applied for an O-licence to run four HGVs and four trailers under the company name P Elsagood Transport Services, it was refused after a public inquiry (PI) in October 2018 found he did not have good repute.

Deputy TC John Baker said he had to balance the positive and negative factors and that the length of the sentence and the fact that it did not conclude until 2017 counted against Elsagood (CM 2 May).

Elsagood appealed the decision, despite accepting he had “one of the worst convictions a person seeking an O-licence could have”. He argued that the deputy TC should not have had access to information from a previous PI in June 2018, at which Elsagood appeared as a witness and in which adverse views were expressed in respect to his veracity.

His concern was that there was a possibility the deputy TC had been biased – despite the fact that the TC in the June PI had recused herself from the October PI where Elsagood’s application was refused.

But the appeal tribunal disagreed with him and dismissed the appeal.

In a written judgment, it said: “We do not see how it can persuasively be contended that a fair-minded and informed observer would think that the deputy TC might be biased.”

The tribunal added that there was no reason why the material given to the deputy TC at the October PI should have been excluded and that it “had relevance to the issues the deputy TC was called upon to decide with respect to repute”.

“He was entitled to take account of Mr Elsagood’s evidence and the TC’s view of it at the previous PI and, similarly, he was entitled to accord significant weight to the conviction for the drugs offences, particularly in the context of the offender now seeking a licence to operate large commercial vehicles,” it concluded.

  • Why not register for our Compliance Bulletin to receive the latest legal and fleet management advice fortnightly? Sign up free now
Author: Chris Tindall
Posted: June 13, 2019, 11:24 am
Editorial Content Category: 
Headline image: 
Summary: 

Environment Agency and HMRC officers have made unannounced visits at more than 60 suspected illegal waste sites in their biggest single joint day of action.

Body Paragraphs: 

Environment Agency and HMRC officers have made unannounced visits at more than 60 suspected illegal waste sites in their biggest single joint day of action. Sites in Lincolnshire, Northamptonshire, Cambridgeshire and Leicestershire were targeted following tip-offs from the public about suspected activity including burning commercial waste and vehicle dismantling.

HMRC is working with the Environment Agency and other partners to help operators understand how to meet their tax obligations in relation to operating a waste site.

Pete Stark, enforcement team leader at the agency, said: “We’re working closely with HMRC to tackle waste crime and ensure businesses are following environmental and financial laws. We take waste crime extremely seriously and will do everything we can to bring those responsible to account.”

An HMRC spokeswoman said: “Any person or business that disposes of material at an unauthorised waste site, or knowingly causes or permits the disposal, may be jointly and severally liable for Landfill Tax and a penalty of up to 100% of the tax due, or face criminal prosecution.”

  • Why not register for our Compliance Bulletin to receive the latest legal and fleet management advice fortnightly? Sign up free now
Author: Chris Tindall
Posted: June 13, 2019, 11:12 am